Posts tagged “beach

dog park day: whole lotta sniffin’ goin’ on…

Yesterday’s Phenology: Another perfect spring day. Low 60s and cloudy in the morning when we went dogparkin’. this is not the best picture of Flynn, but it gives a good idea of what’s up at the dog park on any given day. Dogs being dogs. Everybody happy. Sun came out as we left dogparkland, and it warmed up a bit, upper 60s, low 70s. Lotta green now, and, as I mentioned, all the trees are blossoming furiously. Heard an unusual bird at the dogpark, but there are now enough leaves up in the trees that it was impossible to spot. More research is needed.

Song of the day: Michael Parks, Then Came Bronson. (Okay, not really a song, per se.)


dog park day

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Yesterday’s Phenology: Okay. Winter is here. Officially. Temp got up to maybe 19 or so yesterday. Perhaps a moment of sun in the morning, and then back to the comfort of the gray clouds, like a nice flannel sheet covering us all. Tiny snowflakes starting to sift down in the late afternoon, like powdered sugar, and everything is dusted white at this point, as the temperature drops. The snow will continue, they say, through the night and through Sunday, and then it will turn colder. Yes; all the signs of winter.
Saw a big flock of something – starlings – flying east to west in the afternoon. Perhaps not organized enough to be a flock, but a lot of birds, barely visible against the darkening gray sky, silent and flying in bunches to the west. Where were they going? I also could hear geese overhead, but couldna see them for nowt.
Fresh snow is always good for animal tracks. This evening, walking Flynn, we saw dog tracks. Flynn was interested.

Song of the day: Tommy James & The Shondells – Crystal Blue Persuasion


mississippi beach still life

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On the shore at the dogpark, the shiney shells catch my eye. How long before they get worn away?

Yesterday’s Phenology:  A pretty near perfect day. 77 or so. Noted a lone egret standing in the pond, looking kind of lonely. Though he was with a lot of geese and ducks. Our raspberry plants are heavy with fruit, which is just starting to be ready to pick. Noticed a tree by the pond, a maple, starting to turn a bit. That’s the first one that I’ve seen, really.


shore patrol

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There’s really no need to actually get into the water, Flynn explained to me. Everything that’s really  interesting out there in the water eventually has to come in to shore. Where I am waiting. And ready. Because the shore belongs to me.

Yesterday’s Phenology: Actually a pleasant late-summer day. I’d say 80 degrees, tops, and dry, (after the rain from last night’s thunderstorms dried up.) Did I see much phenology today? Nope. Many bees and other flying insecta in the garden, and on the goldenrod. I leave them alone, they leave me alone. Live and let live, that’s what I say. There appears to be some leaves falling from the trees, but of course it’s much too early for that sort of nonsense, and so I am probably imagining it. They are probably just loose leaves being blown about, and I only happen to see them as they are gently descending to earth. I’ve been hearing more cardinals singing now. Perhaps they were singing all summer, but, in the long days, they were up and singing before I was up and listening. Once again, our clocks are briefly synchronized.

Thirteen hours and 19 minutes of daylight today (8/30), or, as we Phenologists put it, 13:19. That’s right about average for this time of year.


Image

one from the archives: florida beach, 2004

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